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Starnbergersee Part 2

The other location that Philipp and I went to at Starnberg Lake is actually the location the lake is most famous for. On June 13, 1886 King Ludwig II of Bavaria was found drowned in the lake. Ludwig II was the king who had Neuschwanstein built, the castle that the Disneyland Castle is modeled after. He was known as the “Fairy-Tale King.” At the location he was found dead, they later built a cross and Votivkirche, or a small votive chapel. Here are the pictures from there:

The Votivkirche

The Votivkirche

View of the cross in the water from the chapel

View of the cross in the water from the chapel

Close-up of the cross saying "Ludwig King of Bavaria" in German

Close-up of the cross saying

Some familiar faces

Some familiar faces

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Starnbergersee

Philipp and I had a little bit of time off, so we decided to take a day trip to Starnbergersee (or Starnberg Lake). In a way it’s the Munich equivalent of Lake Tahoe as it’s about the same distance away, but it’s no where near as big as Tahoe.

We went to an Art Museum there called the Buchheim Museum. It was created from the art collection of Lothar-Günther Buchheim, a German artist who also happens to be the author of the novel Das Boot, which was later made into an award winning film. Buchheim also founded his own publishing company which publishes his criticism of the art that he studied and collected. In the museum there were exhibits of the works that he collected juxaposed with his own works, which was very interesting, because you could see the influences.

from Max Pechstein, German Expressionist

from Max Pechstein, German Expressionist

from Buchheim, in the South Pacific

from Buchheim, in the South Pacific

You can kind of see the influences here, although I would like to find better examples. I can’t find the exact same pictures from the two artists on the internet (I suppose I should have written the names of the works down, but I just didn’t think of it at the time.) Two things I find interesting about Buchheim’s stylist evolution are 1. he used Asian paintbrushes, which he held vertically and 2. you can tell by the laying of the paint colors that he first painted the colors and then the outlines. This means that his eye sees color first, and then form. I usually paint by first sketching or drawing the outlines, and then color them in, so I’m curious to try Buchheim’s technique.

There were also two exhibits, one on top of the other, of other German Expressionists and of African art. I was amazing to see the resemblances!

An African mask like the ones in the exhibit

An African mask like the ones in the exhibit

A portrait by the artist Erich Henkel

A portrait by the artist Erich Henkel

It’s amazing to see that Erich Henkel probably saw these masks. The forms of the eyes are so similar and the cheekbones give the same general impression. If, in fact, Henkel was not influenced by African masks, it certainly is interesting to see such cross-cultural representations being so much the same!

I had a particular interest in seeing the Expressionist artists’ use of linoleum and wood etchings for printing. I gained some inspiration for my own lithographic works and hopefully I’ll have time to develop those soon!

Anyway, here are pictures from our excursion:

The Buchheim Museum with Starnberg Lake in the background

The Buchheim Museum with Starnberg Lake in the background

Giraffes outside of the museum!

Giraffes outside of the museum!

An old BMW made into Art!

An old BMW made into Art!

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